Episode 6

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In Episode 6 of Talking Musicology Stephen and Liam discuss the New Deleuzicology by way of Klaas Coulembier’s “Multi-Temporality: an Analytical Approach to Contemporary Music, Embracing Concepts of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari”; and new music and hybridity by way of Mike Vaughan’s “Register, Dialect, Convolution, and ‘Crosstalk’: Reflections on ‘…the Zones of Influence and Hybridity Between Electroacoustic, Acousmatique Music, Techno, and IDM’”.

Liam having fallen down a well the day before recording, his contribution had to be delivered over the phone; we apologise for the poor audio quality.

Episode available via iTunes and others podcast providers.

You can also download it from here, and stream it here

Klaas Coulembier, “Multi-Temporality: an Analytical Approach to Contemporary Music, Embracing Concepts of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari.” Music Analysis, 35/iii (2016): 341-372.

Mike Vaughan, “Register, Dialect, Convolution, and ‘Crosstalk’: Reflections on ‘…the Zones of Influence and Hybridity Between Electroacoustic, Acousmatique Music, Techno, and IDM’”. Contemporary Music Review, 35:2 (2016): 166-183.

Episode 5

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In this episode of Talking Musicology we discuss Ben Piekut’s ‘Indeterminacy, Free Improvisation, and the Mixed Avant-Garde: Experimental Music in London, 1965-75’, in which Piekut writes about overlapping avant-garde musics in Britain and elsewhere through the lens of Music Now, a non-profit music organisation run by Victor Schonfeld.

Episode available via iTunes and others podcast providers.

You can also download it from here, and stream it here

Benjamin Piekut. “Indeterminacy, Free Improvisation, and the Mixed Avant-Garde: Experimental Music in London, 1965-75.” Journal of the American Musicological Society 67/3 (Fall 2014): 769-824.

Episode 4

In this episode of Talking Musicology we discuss an article by Richard Taruskin focused on music and power in Soviet Russia.

You can listen to the episode below; to download click the arrow on the right.


Richard Taruskin, ‘Two Serendipities. Keynoting a Conference, “Music and Power”,’ in The Journal of Musicology, Vol. 33 No. 3, Summer 2016, pp. 401-431
Abstract: http://jm.ucpress.edu/content/33/3/401

Episode 3

In this episode of Talking Musicology we discuss articles by Mark Greif on Radiohead and the philosophy of pop and by Jennifer Walshe et al on a new movement in composition, the New Discipline.

You can listen to the episode below; to download click the arrow on the right.

 
Mark Greif, ‘Radiohead, or the Philosophy of Pop,’ in n+1, Issue 3 (Fall 2005).
Article online: https://nplusonemag.com/issue-3/essays/radiohead-or-philosophy-pop/

Jennifer Walshe et al, Various articles on the New Discipline, in Musiktexte, 149 (May 2016):
Articles online: http://musiktexte.de/MusikTexte-149

Episode 2

In this episode of Talking Musicology we discuss articles by Lydia Goehr on the art of preparation and preluding and Scott Gleason on phenomenological analysis and the music of Otomo Yoshihide.

You can listen to the episode below; to download click the arrow on the right.

 

Lydia Goehr, ‘Does it Matter Where We Begin? Or, On the Art of Preparation and Preluding,’ in MTO: a Journal of the Society for Music Theory, Volume 21, Number 3, September 2015.
Article online: http://www.mtosmt.org/issues/mto.15.21.3/mto.15.21.3.goehr.html

Scott Gleason, ‘Analysis as Improvisation: A Phenomenology of Otomo Yoshihide’s Anode 2,’ in Perspectives of New Music, Vol. 53, No. 1 (Winter 2015), pp. 121-141.
Preview: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7757/persnewmusi.53.1.0121?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Episode 1

In the first episode of Talking Musicology we discuss two articles: Georgina Born and Kyle Devine on music, gender and class in UK higher education, and Robert Hasegawa on the harmonic techniques of Georg Friedrich Haas.

You can listen to the episode below. To download click the arrow on the right.

Georgina Born and Kyle Devine, ‘Music Technology, Gender, and Class: Digitization, Educational and Social Change in Britain,’ in Twentieth-Century Music, 12 (2015), pp 135-172. Abstract: http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1478572215000018

Robert Hasegawa, ‘Clashing Harmonic Systems in Haas’s Blumenstück and in vain,’ in Music Theory Spectrum, Vol. 37, Issue 2 (2015), pp. 204-23. Abstract: https://mts.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/09/06/mts.mtv014